Author Topic: Performance Evaluation of Proposed SEHEE-MAC for wireless Sensor Network in Habi  (Read 2464 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

IJSER Content Writer

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 327
  • Karma: +0/-1
    • View Profile
Quote
Author : Mrs. Swati V. Sankpal, Dr. Vishram Bapat
International Journal of Scientific & Engineering Research Volume 2, Issue 10, October-2011
ISSN
2229-5518
Download Full Paper : PDF

AbstractóEnvironmental sensor networks have been a topic of significant research in recent years. Sensor network enables researchers to do continuous long term, autonomous sensing of many different aspects of environmental systems. They must be so energy efficient that they can remain in same situation with little human interaction and be maintenance-free for years together. Habitat monitoring, with its focus on dynamic interactions within and between a variety of scales is an ideal application of sensor network. Many protocols have been proposed for WSNs and have focused on extending the lifetime of sensor networks, WSNs powered by ambient energy harvesting are more useful and economical in the long-term because ambient energy may be harvested from the environment at all times. To improve the life time of WSN this work evaluate the performance of new proposed scheme-Solar Energy Harvesting Energy Efficient MAC (SEHEE-MAC). The SEHEE-MAC protocol controls the activities of Radio by using slotted preamble technique and obtains significant energy savings by allowing nodes to sleep for extended periods of time. The results are compared with ZigBee and Preamble protocols for solar harvesting sensor networks.

Index TermsóHabitat, MAC, Slotted Preamble, Solar, WSN

1   INTRODUCTION                                                                     
Wireless adhoc network is a generic term grouping different networks, which are self organizing, meaning that there is neither a centralized administration nor a fixed network infrastructure, and communication links are wireless. Sensor network enables researchers to do continuous long term, autonomous sensing of many different aspects of environmental systems. Today, densely deployed sensor networks are being scaled to the size of the organisms under study, sampling phenomena at frequencies the organisms encounter, and isolated in patterns that capture the full range of environmental exposures to provide the fine-grain information needed for accurate modeling and prediction.
    They must be unobtrusive yet durable under a range of environmental stresses, including damage caused by the organisms themselves. They must be so energy efficient that they can remain in same situation with little human interac-tion and be maintenance-free for years together. Several qua-litative differences from traditional instrumentation make sensor networks attractive for habitat and environmental monitoring. [36] Increased power efficiency gives applications more flexibility in resolving fundamental design tradeoffs, e.g. between sampling rates and battery lifetimes. Low-power radios with well-designed protocol stacks allow generalized communications among network nodes, rather than simple point-to-point telemetry.

   
Habitat monitoring, with its focus on dynamic interactions within and between a variety of scales is an ideal application of sensor network because answering fundamental bio-complexity research questions on animal interaction on landscapes that are changing in response to normal as well as anthropogenic requires large amount of diverse data, collected and correlated across large temporal and spatial scale.
   Much of the research on sensor networks have fo-cused on extending the lifetime of sensor networks which are assumed to rely on finite energy sources like batteries for power. In contrast, wireless sensor networks (WSNs) powered by ambient energy harvesting are more useful and economical in the long-term as they can operate for very long periods of time until hardware failure because ambient energy may be harvested from the environment at all times. However, as the rate of charging is usually much lower than the rate of energy consumption for the sensor nodes, proposed MAC (SEHEE-MAC) nodes can only be awake for a short period of time before it needs to shut down in order to recharge. Moreover, the time taken to charge up the sensor is not constant due to environmental factors. This work addresses this fact by proposing power controlling algorithm.
2   RELATED WORK

In the literature, many protocols have been proposed for WSNs. Most of them aim to achieve low energy consumption in transmitting packets between nodes. These protocols also have the goals of low delay and minimum packet loss.
 In [1], Ye et al. proposed S-MAC for WSN. S-MAC uses a few novel techniques to reduce energy consumption and support self-configuration. First, nodes form virtual clusters based on common sleep schedules to reduce control overhead and enable traffic adaptive wake-up. Second, S-MAC uses in-channel signaling to avoid overhearing unnecessary traffic. Finally, S-MAC applies message passing to reduce contention latency.
 Ye et al. [2] introduced SCP-MAC, which uses Scheduled Channel Polling (SCP) to achieve more energy savings than other protocols that use coordinated transmissions and listen periods. The contributions of SCP-MAC are the ultra low duty cycles it achieves and its capability to adapt to variable traffic loads. Dam et al. [3] proposed T-MAC, a contention based MAC protocol for WSNs.
 Lu et al. [4] proposed DMAC, a protocol whose objective is to achieve very low latency. Mainwaring et al. [5] provided an in-depth study of applying WSNs to real-world habitat monitoring. A set of system design requirements are developed that cover the hardware design of the nodes, the design of the sensor network, and the capabilities for remote data access and management.
 The SEA-MAC [6], focused on reducing energy consumption in environmental    monitoring applications. Compared to SMAC [1], SEA-MAC reduces the duty cycle    (DC) of nodes, and thus lowers drastically idle listening.   Miguel A. Erazo et al,[7] propose a new MAC protocol to achieve even lower    energy consumption for periodic monitoring applications. This protocol takes advantage of the fact that the traffic pattern is periodic to achieve low energy consumption levels. This approach focuses on reducing packet delay and collisions. Zebra Net [8] uses PDA-level device with 802.11b wireless network. Great    Duck Island [9] uses Berkeley mote, and watch ducks without disturbing them at low    cost.

Read More:
Click here...